Bio

photo of writer and dreamerThe fun stuff:

I am a multimedia producer/writer/communications strategist/wife/mother of three boys/dreamer/doer. Not necessarily in that order. Journalism college grad with honors, recipient of master’s of communication in digital media, winner of some writing and professional awards, always-multitasking workaholic. Collector of quotes, scrapbooking paraphernalia for that someday project, and dust in my home office.

Sandwiched in between two multinational generations, I am a city girl loving the rural life and all that it entails – multiple pets, a toxin-free garden, fresh air and an outdoor “office” in the gazebo. Dabbler in creative nonfiction writing and independent filmmaking.

 

The (slightly) more serious stuff:

I am a European-born, trilingual-speaking writer who traded the Alaska snow for Washington rain in 2000 after finally graduating from college (I say finally, because it was a nearly 10-year deal that required changing countries once and majors twice, plus a few years of nonschooling in between while I gave in to diaper duties and working at Kmart).

Finally clutching a college diploma in hand, safe from encounters with moose and driving on ice, I passed through Washington state with a firm idea:  I was on the fast track to moving my way up the career ladder and across the country until I would arrive in the Publishing Capital of the World, aka New York City, and work for a news magazine.

I probably forgot to file my itinerary with the universe, because instead, I settled in Washington state and not even a year after landing my first “real” reporter job, I hung my career hat so I could spend more time with my two young boys. Alas, in less than two weeks, I got bored of being “just mom” and decided to fly solo as a freelancer.

In the more than 12 years since then, I have written hundreds of articles for local, regional and some national newspapers and magazines. I turned around a nonprofit community newspaper; I’ve won a few awards; I’ve watched my boys turn into teenagers and grew the family some more. I also finally fulfilled my dream of a master’s degree (10 years late but better than never, they say!) and expanded into multimedia production and digital media strategic and consulting work.

As a full-time self-employed storyteller — multimedia producer, consultant, strategist, writer and editor — I love the ability to make my own schedule and be my own boss — which, in translation, means I work harder than any company would ever expect from an employee, and I’m here to serve to my fullest every person who hires me, whether it’s an editor or a business owner.

What I love the best about my work is being able to tell stories — about people, companies, events — and making someone’s day. I love the privilege of being invited into people’s homes, witnessing personal moments, experiencing the pulse of communities, talking to people from all walks of life, and in the end fishing inside me for the right words or images to tell the rest of the world about it. Being a storyteller, whether through writing or multimedia, is an honor as well as a high responsibility that I highly treasure.

If you like more substance — experience, jobs, awards, education and the rest of the fixings, please read my complete resume here or my LinkedIn profile here. You can also “like” me on Facebook and follow me on Twitter.

creative writing break: from the essays file

Memories

Memories are like birds.

They fly, fast and free, with their wings spread open.
They are swarming, loud.

Once in a while, they stop still.

They nest in our hearts.

Unlike a bird's nest, memories are less exposed to the world. They are concealed deep inside our hearts and soul, often time stuffed there by a mind that does not want to remember a painful sensation.

Other times they are lively and ecstatic, laughing out loud or just smiling contentedly.

These are the memories that we put into pictures and keepsakes in order to capture them into something more material, something more feasible that we can touch and see over and over again, something that would live through generations to tell the happy story.

Those are the memories of a first bouquet, wedding bells, first charming baby smile, the long gone dear friend…

They are the memories we try to hang on to, try to grasp them with our fingers and clutch them in our fists… too precious to let go.

Among them is a picture of the sunset and a tree in full bloom.

What is the soul trying to tell by captioning these serene moments onto the glossy paper? Are these part of the memories that will be shared with generations to come, or are they just a trace of lost happiness, an attempt to recreate a smile of the nature itself?

(1998)